Category Archives: Mostly Weekly

Everyone You Love Did Drugs

It turns out that a lot of accomplished, well-respected historical figures did drugs. From Winston Churchill taking amphetamines to Thomas Edison lacing his wine with cocaine, not everyone who uses narcotics is a hopeless basket case living in a dumpster. While some drug users spiral into addiction and crime, others go on to become president. It’s time to debunk read more »

Congressional New Year’s Resolutions

  As 2017 thankfully limps to its conclusion, we turn our sights to 2018 and ways in which Congress can be less awful. In this special holiday edition of “Mostly Weekly” Andrew Heaton comes up with some out-of-the-box ideas for our legislators: Find out what’s inside the stuff they vote on Quit hemorrhaging money like a drunken sailor Balance read more »

We’re Spending Too Much on Defense

  How many killy things do we need before our country is safe from invasion? The United States defense budget is enormous–it’s larger than the next eight largest countries combined, most of which we’re buddies with. But military spending is only partially designed around our protection. A significant portion of America’s defense tab is caught up in read more »

13 Non-Pedophile Reason to Hate Roy Moore

  Even if you disregard the nine women accusing Roy Moore of sexual assault, there are plenty of reasons to despise him. Judicial incompetence, constitutional ignorance, and industrial strength bigotry are just some of the issues with the Alabama judge. In the latest Mostly Weekly Andrew Heaton covers some of the many reasons why Roy Moore sucks: He taught a class discouraging women read more »

Legalize Medically-Assisted Sex

  Nine out of 10 doctors agree sex is good for you, or at least better for you than smoking. But what happens if you have a disability that makes it difficult to engage in sex, or find a sexual partner in the first place? Enter sex surrogates, professionals who help the disabled work through their read more »

How Sugar Subsidies Ruin Halloween

  This Halloween while you’re getting pudgy from candy, crony capitalists are getting rich off of sugar subsidies. The system is rigged through price controls, subsidies, and tariffs, all designed to protect the sugar industry from competition–and basic math. In the latest “Mostly Weekly” Andrew Heaton tears into the Willy Wonkas gaming the system, and read more »

Why the Lights Are Still Off in Puerto Rico

  Regardless of how the president and FEMA have responded, Puerto Rico was set up for disaster well before Hurricane Maria hit. Yo-yo tax breaks, needlessly expensive imports, and crippling debt all lead to a shoddy infrastruture that’s still without power on much of the island. On the latest “Mostly Weekly,” Andrew Heaton explores: how read more »

Why We Should Privatize the Postal Service

  I don’t think Hell exists, but if it does, I’m pretty sure it involves standing in line for stamps at a post office. We explore why the Postal Service is so terrible, and how to fix it, in the latest Mostly Weekly. Did you know the Post Office once tried to deliver mail by read more »

Minimum Wage: Bad for Humans, Good for Robots

  Some of America’s largest cities are ratcheting minimum wage up, while progressive luminaries are calling to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour. Only evil people would oppose this, right? Unless…That’s what the robots want us to think? When the government uses minimum wage laws to abolish cheap labor, it makes employees more expensive. read more »

Stop Subsidizing Sports!

  Let’s talk about “sports”—that thing where we gather around to watch a muscular stranger put a regulation-size ball in a specific location. Why are taxpayers forced to pony up cash for athletic ventures that don’t benefit them? Franchise owners routinely extort massive stadium subsidies through threats of relocation and fake promises of economic revitalization. read more »

How to Stop Patent Trolls

  It’s been a bad year for patent trolls, from a Supreme Court decision squelching their ability to funnel lawsuits to East Texas to this week’s ruling that Personal Audio LLC can’t claim it owns a patent on the entirety of podcasting. In the latest Mostly Weekly, Reason’s Andrew Heaton explores what patent trolls are, the damage they do, read more »

The War on Interns

It’s intern season, but many aspiring students aren’t able to get internships—because a lot of them are illegal. Federal law restricts companies from hiring unpaid interns if they’re performing actual useful duties, which means it’s harder for workers to get a foot in the door. In the latest Mostly Weekly Andrew Heaton proposes that consenting adults should be read more »

Trump’s Cuba Crackdown

  President Trump is rolling back some of his predecessor’s Cuban policy reforms, potentially setting back important American relations with cigars and rum. In 2014 President Obama restored diplomatic relations with communist Cuba, re-opening the U.S. embassy on the island nation and lifting some travel and financial restrictions. This month Trump announced he was “canceling the last administration’s read more »

The Government Hates Boobs

You’re going to be surprised by this, but there’s actually a decent amount of overlap between government bureaucrats and breasts. We cover that and more on the latest episode of Mostly Weekly. Frankly I’m a little astonished that I didn’t tackle the issue sooner, given the tremendous amount of thought I’ve independently put into either category. It’s read more »

What the Government Can Learn from BDSM

Last week Washington, DC shut down as everyone and their dog fled to sports bars to watch James Comey’s congressional testimony. The uncomfortable spectacle raised more questions than merely Russia’s involvement in the 2016 election. The former FBI Director’s retelling of his private dinner with the then-president elect had the timbre of an overbearing boss sexually harassing read more »

Net Neutrality Nixed

People are freaking out now that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is beginning the repeal of Net Neutrality regulations, which give the government the right to regulate Internet Service Providers (ISPs). The main arguments in favor of Net Neutrality are really arguments guarding against hypotheticals: that ISPs could otherwise block and censor content (they never have) read more »

Freaky Friday Politics: Republicans And Democrats Keep Switching Positions

Democrats and Republicans are pivoting on issues faster than a bipolar swing dancer on a merry-go-round. Republicans are now big government protectionists who can make, let alone read, a solvent budget. Democrats support free trade (see: Hillary Clinton), states’ rights (see: legal weed) and local control (see: sanctuary cities). It’s like the two parties switched read more »

Why I’m Boycotting the White House Correspondents’ Dinner

It’s a good sign that I didn’t recognize anyone during the White House Correspondents’ Dinner broadcast until halfway through. In the previous eight years Hollywood celebrities parachuted into the nation’s capital to strut up a red carpet and mingle with various tuxedo-clad political barnacles. That kind of hobnobbing woefully gives hope to impressionable student council read more »

Gambling on March Madness

Go team! Score points! Here at Mostly Weekly, we know everything about sports matches, ball statistics, and what a Lebron James is. And no, we didn’t do theater in high school. Why do you ask? But did YOU know that it’s illegal to bet monie$ on an athletics match? The government thinks you’re too stupid and read more »

WTF is Daylight Savings?

What is Daylight Savings? Why do we have it? We shouldn’t! Maybe it’s all a conspiracy by the Sun Dial Lobby. And defended by that friend who’s always late to things. Many states are considering proposals to abolish daylight-savings time. So watch out… lazy vampires. I also wrote a more in-depth piece for Reason which is read more »